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Past Talks

2016-2017: Trent Talks High School Edition

Spring 2016: Trent Talks High School Edition

2014-2015: 50 Talks in 50 Schools

2016-2017 Trent Talks

October 2016:

Thomas A Stewart, Peterborough
Dr. Melanie Buddle: How to Prepare for First-year University: You Can do This!

Adam Scott, Peterborough
Dr. Melanie Buddle: How to Prepare for First-year University: You Can do This!

December 2016:

Thomas A Stewart, Peterborough
Robyne Hanley-Dafoe: Finding & Fostering Your Resilient Self

Bomanville High School
Mr. Craig Cameron: How to Prepare for First-year University: You Can do This!

Notre Dame Catholic Secondary School, Ajax
Dr. Magda Havas: Is Wireless Technology Affecting your Health?

Notre Dame Catholic Secondary School, Ajax
Dr. Melanie Buddle: How to Prepare for First-year University: You Can do This!

St. Peter Secondary, Peterborough
Ms. Cammie Jaquays: Entrepreneurship 101: What is an Entrepreneur?

St. Stephen's CSS, Bowmanville
Dr. Stephen Katz: The Sociology of Mobile Devices and the ‘Tethered’ Self

St. Peter Secondary, Peterborough
Dr. Marc Champagne: Who Needs Philosophy?

Notre Dame Catholic Secondary School, Ajax
Dr. Gail Johnson Morris: Leadership is an Inside Game

Full List of 2016/2017 Talks

Back to top >>

Mr. Adrian Ash: TBC
Dr. Simon Adam: Rethinking mental illness: What if we've been wrong all along?
Dr. Liana Brown: TBC
Dr. Michael Bruder: Why Aristotle Still Matters (And Why Philosophers Want Your Teachers to Know Him Better)
Dr. Melanie Buddle: How to Prepare for First-year University: You Can do This!
Ms. Carly Bumbacco: Does Burnout Mean Drop-out? A Relationships Perspective
Dr. Marc Champagne: Who Needs Philosophy?
Ms. Sherri Degasparro: TBC
Dr. Hugh Elton: Studying Roman Warfare in the 21st Century
Dr. Liam Mitchell & Dr. Mike Epp: Videogame Art
Dr. Michael Fox: Fish and Fish Ecology
Dr. Joanna Freeland: Evolution: A Thing of the Past?
Ms. Robyne Hanley-Dafoe:  Finding & Fostering Your Resilient Self
Body Image in the Digital Age
Dr. Magda Havas: Is Wireless Technology Affecting your Health?
Dr. Hugh Hodges: TBC
Ms. Carla Ionescu: Modern Hercules in Film: The Most Heroic Lie
Being a Refugee in the 80’s: A Memory of Pain and Celebration
Ms. Cammie Jaquays: Entrepreneurship 101: What is an Entrepreneur?
Dr. Gail Johnson Morris: Leadership is an Inside Game
Dr. Stephen Katz: The Sociology of Mobile Devices and the ‘Tethered’ Self
Dr. Katrina Keefer: The Construction of “Race” and the Historical Importance of Africa
Dr. Anne Keenleyside: The Last Expedition of Sir John Franklin: Evidence from the Skeletal Remains
Dr. Christopher Kyle: Wildlife Forensics
Mr. Malcolm MacTaggart: Business 101 meets Ethical Business Management and Corporate Social Responsibility
Dr. James Onusko: The Serious Business of Play: Why Acting Your Age is Overrated
Dr. David Patton: Exoplanets
Ms. Jesiqua Rapley: Handling Stress in High School and Beyond
Mr. Jacob Rodenburg: Revisiting the Games of our Ancestors and First Nations
Dr. Margaret Steffler: Canadian and Global Girlhoods: From Anne of Green Gables to I am Malala
Ms. Katie Tremblay-Beaton: Music Education in the 21st Century
Dr. Andrew Vreugdenhill: Green Chemistry: Doing Chemistry Differently
Ms. Susan Willis Chan: The Secret Lives of Native Bees
Dr. Rachel Wortis: Phases of Matter

Mr. Adrian Ash: TBC

TBC

Dr. Simon Adam: Rethinking Mental Illness: What if We've Been Wrong all Along?

Mental illness is one of the hottest topics today. It is everywhere in the media. It saturates the hallways and classrooms of universities, colleges, high schools, elementary schools, even daycare centers! Research on mental illness receives millions of dollars from various parts of society-research that undoubtedly examines it as a medical and scientific phenomenon. In other words, the obsession with mental illness and its explosive diffusion into society frames it as a medical disease, located in the brain and in the chemistry of the body. But what if we are wrong? What if all this energy we are investing in trying to understand and control mental illness is misguided? What if mental illness is something other than a medical disorder? In this talk, we collectively examine the social construction of what is currently understood as mental illness. We interrogate the scientific ground onto which mental illness has been built and likewise bring in the social as a legitimate precursor to what is currently termed 'mental illness.' We might even dare to reject the medical understanding of mental illness and consider personal history, trauma, gender, sexuality, age, and race oppressions, and likewise other social dimensions of people as the 'cause.'

 

Dr. Liana Brown: TBC

TBC

Dr. Michael Bruder: Why Aristotle Still Matters (and why Philosophers want your teachers to know him better)
*Available in Durham Region

In the entire history of Western thinking, there have only been three major theories of how we should act in order to be moral.  The oldest one of all is Aristotle’s, who lived over 2000 years ago, and it is his theory that is fast becoming the most popular in philosophical thinking about how to teach people. For Aristotle, to live good lives we shouldn’t focus on following rules or trying to calculate the benefit of an action, we should focus on how people are brought up and educated throughout their lives and teach them to appreciate thinking critically about how to act.  The older model of schools focused on rules and had specific outcomes in mind for its graduates (usually mundane, repetitive labour).  Philosophers are trying to help shape today’s model of schools into one which continues to promote new and different ways of ‘flourishing’.  That’s Aristotle’s word for becoming excellent at what expresses your human-ness.  This is a talk about you, and how you can be educated in a way that allows you to be the most excellent you that you can be. (If Aristotle is right.)

Dr. Melanie Buddle: How to Prepare for First-year University: You can do this!

In this presentation, Melanie will provide an overview of what a student can expect when making the transition from high school to university/college and she’ll offer some insight about how students can best prepare for that transition and make the most of their first-year experience. She also provides an overview of really useful resources (from health and wellness to academic skills and careers) available to students in post-secondary institutions to help them balance their emotional, physical and academic needs. Melanie has a doctorate in Canadian History and has taught courses in the History and Canadian studies departments at Trent. She is now an academic advisor and meets regularly with students who are in every stage of their university journey, from ‘just about to attend’ to ‘just about to graduate.’

Ms. Carly Bumbacco: Does Burnout Mean Drop-out? A Relationships Perspective

Ms. Carly Bumbacco holds a masters of psychology degree and has experience teaching as a part-time contract faculty member at Trent University. The topic of this talk focuses on the impact of secure vs. insecure child-parent relationships (attachment theory) on students’ transition to university, specifically, the processes of burnout, disengagement, barriers to help-seeking, and drop-out. The questions explored are: What is attachment? How can students prevent burnout and dropout? How can attachment theory prepare students for university? This talk also aims to engage students in the field of psychology. 

Dr. Marc Champagne: Who Needs Philosophy?

Students who have never taken philosophy often think that it is a “bird” course that they can fly through without effort. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Philosophy is the systematic attempt to answer three core questions: What is there? How do I know it? What should I do? Clearly, to go about one’s day, a person must rely on a set of working answers to those questions. However, until those answers are made explicit, we cannot evaluate whether they are correct. My goal, then, will be to show how you have no choice but to do philosophy; your only choice is whether to do it badly or rigorously. So, who needs philosophy? Everyone.

Ms. Sherri Degasparro: TBC

TBC

Dr. Hugh Elton: Studying Roman Warfare in the 21st Century

The talk looks at how our understanding of Roman warfare has changed recently, reflecting new technologies such as video games and GoogleEarth. This talk can be delivered in Peterborough during the daytime, utilizing a PowerPoint presentation. Dr. Elton is with the Program in Ancient Greek and Roman Studies.

Dr. Liam Mitchell & Dr. Mike Epp: Videogame Art

In 2010, film critic Roger Ebert famously claimed that “video games can never be art.”  In this talk, we’ll be responding to that claim by focusing on the player’s experience of the game in its own terms – on those experiential elements of gameplay that, like art, cannot ultimately be put into words.  More specifically, we’ll be highlighting the ways that contemporary videogames deliver unconventional narratives through their mechanics.

Dr. Michael Fox: Fish and Fish Ecology

The topic of this talk is flexible, and suitable for any age group. Some possible topics are 
- Aquatic invasive species: What makes a species invasive in an aquatic environment? Why should we be concerned about them? What are some of the main species of concern in central Canada? What can be done about them?
- Freshwater fishes and their adaptations: What are some of the dominant fish species in our area? How do they differ in body type? What do they eat and how are they adapted to catch their prey? How are fishes different from warm-blooded animals like birds and mammals? How can we sample them? Dr. Fox is with the School of the Environment and the Department of Biology.

Dr. Joanna Freeland: Evolution: A Thing of the Past?

This talk focuses on what we mean by evolution, and why it remains critically important that we understand this process from the perspective of current issues such as antibiotic resistance, adaptation to climate change, agriculture, and invasive species. This talk is suitable for Grades 5 and above. Dr. Freeland is with the Department of Biology.

Ms. Robyne Hanley-Dafoe

Finding & Fostering Your Resilient Self:

Robyne Hanley-Dafoe’s work stems from her international travels asking the question, ‘what makes a child resilient?’ Robyne has a unique philosophy to studying resiliency.  She defines resiliency as ‘the capacity to make a masterpiece out of the brokenness of our lives’, and more generally, how can we make the best out of the challenges, barriers, and obstacles we face in our lives.  This talk will use narrative pedagogy to share stories that shaped the framework of the 5 contributing factors that help a person develop a resilient self.   Students will also be presented strategies for grit and persistence derived from the research on growth mind set.

Body Image in the Digital Age

Warning: Reflections in mirrors may be distorted by socially constructed ideas of beauty.  Robyne Hanley-Dafoe’s talk explores how body image is affected in the digital age.  The research presents staggering implications of how girls and boys are being impacted.  This talk will present strategies and approaches to reduce these harmful effects and discuss the importance of digital literacy and critical thinking skills in youth. 

Dr. Magda Havas: Is Wireless Technology Affecting your Health?

Do you use your cell phone at least a dozen times a day?  Do you keep your cell phone in your pocket or bra? Do you keep your cell phone under your pillow when you sleep at night? Do you panic if you can’t find your cell phone? If this describes your behaviour and if you experience some combination of headaches fatigue, brain fog and difficulty concentrating, difficulty sleeping, anxiety, heart palpitations, ringing in the ear, dizziness, nausea or skin problems, you may be electrically sensitive. Learn how to use wireless technology safely to optimize your health.  

Dr. Hugh Hodges: TBC

TBC

Ms. Carla Ionescu:
 
Modern Hercules in Film: The Most Heroic Lie

There is great disconnect between the Hercules of Greek myth and the modern world. Popular films and literature present us with heroes that must be morally pure. So-called “anti-heroes” are occasionally tolerated in marginal media, but even here their transgressions are typically mitigated somehow. The heroes of Greek legend often existed solely because they were transgressors. Tantalus, Oedipus, Orestes: their stories are of broken taboos, stories of cannibalism, incest, kin-slaying. Later authors may have complicated their stories, but violation is at the core of their being. While the common people of ancient Greece benefited from Hercules’s actions as a slayer of monsters, none of his actions were motivated by altruism. Rather, it was shame at best that moved him: in most tellings, his famous twelve labors were penance for the death of his family at his own hands. Many of his other deeds were motivated by hunger, lust, or just boredom. This talk will discuss how Hollywood has continually represented Hercules as the ultimate alpha male, by providing audiences with only a simplistic analysis of his myth and traditions, and ignoring the controversies and complex meanings of his story.

Being a Refugee in the 80’s: A Memory of Pain and Celebration:

As a child, escaping communist Romania seemed more like a mystical fantasy rather than the brutal reality of becoming a refugee in a new world. In 1985 the Romanian population in Canada, particularly in Toronto, numbered less than 2000. My family and I were truly strangers in a strange land. I was 10 yrs. old, did not speak a word of English, and had never seen a grocery store. Running from a violent regime forced my small family through experiences of trauma and perpetual fear. Arriving in Canada, the four of us were alienated in homeless shelters, low paying jobs and constant adolescent bullying. This talk is based on a small autobiographical story I wrote to commemorate 30 yrs. of living free, in 2015. I share this memory both to remind myself of all the obstacles I have overcome as a child refugee, and also to honour the hard work and sacrifice of my parents who gave up their homeland, so that my brother and I can have a place to call home.

Ms. Cammie Jaquays: Entrepreneurship 101: What is an Entrepreneur?

TBC

Dr. Gail Johnson Morris: Leadership is an Inside Game
*Available in Durham Region

Learn 3 key leadership fundamentals during this high-energy, interactive session.  Of interest to rising, high-potential students who are curious about what it takes to excel in business leadership roles.  Activities are designed to give students increased self-awareness and to explore 21st century organizational leadership insights.  Dr. Gail is a strategist and lectures with the School of Business at Trent Durham; her session is available in Durham or the GTA.

Dr. Stephen Katz: The Sociology of Mobile Devices and the ‘Tethered’ Self

The Internet, virtual communities, social media and online networks are some of the most important historical developments of our time. Along with portable computing and smart-phone technologies, we are now able to be mobile with our media and be ‘tethered’ to it wherever we go. Wi-fi has also changed every environment, inside and outside into spaces of connectivity and availability. However, as we excitedly shift our lives between states of online/offline, plugged/unplugged, and reality/virtuality, new questions about the consequences of new technologies are surfacing. How much of our privacy can really control? As we circulate thousands of YouTube clips, Facebook exchanges, Instagram photos, and Twitter messages, the separation between our online and real lives is quickly disappearing. What happens to the sense of independence for young people if they are expected to be ‘always on’, where everybody they know, including parents, are always ‘there’? How we can mature our feelings and experiences with the constant pressure to ‘share’ and be validated by ‘friends’? Is ‘cyber-bullying’ a growing problem? Have mobile devices changed the classroom and affected student attention and performance at school? Professor Stephen Katz, from the Department of Sociology at Trent University, will lead a student discussion to explore these and other questions.

Dr. Katrina Keefer: The Construction of “Race” and the Historical Importance of Africa

In the ancient world, Africans were welcomed and seen as sophisticated, advanced peoples. With great empires like Kush and later Aksum, the continent was known for its accomplishments. In the Middle Ages, African clergymen traveled from Ethiopia to Italy, and paintings and statues offer beautiful depictions of Africans alongside Europeans. What changed? How did we go from a recognition of our shared humanity to today’s divided tensions? This talk seeks to help understand the recent invention of race, the shadow of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and how to contextualize the social tensions around racism today. Understanding how perceptions changed and more importantly, why, is a tool with which to challenge ideas of race for today’s young thinkers. This talk is aimed at helping students of all backgrounds to understand the pernicious ways that Africans were marginalized due to the slave trade where previously, the world knew them as equals. Racism can only be challenged through understanding, and this talk is intended to assist in that goal.

Dr. Anne Keenleyside: The Last Expedition of Sir John Franklin: Evidence from the Skeletal Remains
*Spring 2017 only

The 1845 expedition of Sir John Franklin was the worst disaster in the history of arctic exploration.  With a crew of 129 men aboard two ships, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, the expedition set out to discover the Northwest Passage.  Tragically, Franklin and his crew never achieved their goal, and the expedition ended in the loss of the entire crew.  Within the last few decades, the skeletal remains of some of the crewmembers who perished have been recovered from King William Island in the central Canadian Arctic.  Detailed analyses of these remains have provided clues to the health of these individuals, including evidence of cannibalism and lead poisoning.  DNA analysis has also shed light on the ill-fated expedition and has the potential to identify some of these individuals.  Dr. Keenleyside is with the Department of Anthropology. Age group: Grade 9 and beyond (history or anthropology classes).

Dr. Christopher Kyle: Wildlife Forensics

Discussion about the work we do at Trent in wildlife forensics in terms of trade in endangered species, poaching, pet and wildlife attacks, as well as non-human DNA applications for human forensic investigations.

Mr. Malcolm MacTaggart Business 101 meets Ethical Business Management and Corporate Social Responsibility

This talk includes a 50,000 foot view of business management. Incorporating a mock lecture to give students some experience with the lecture environment, this talk weaves throughout the issues and importance of ethics and corporate social responsibility. Mr. MacTaggart is from the Trent University Durham campus.

Dr. James Onusko - The Serious Business of Play: Why Acting Your Age is Overrated

Dr. Onusko provides an interactive talk on why young people should not abandon play as they age. As teenagers make the transition to adulthood they are often told that they must leave behind much of what has defined their childhoods. Building on Nietzche’s premise that “Play is the highest form of human activity,” James explores play in historical context, examines some of its meanings and forms, and advocates for the benefits of play at all ages. James holds a PhD in Canadian Studies and is an Assistant Professor at Trent University. He has taught in the Canadian Studies, History, Political Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies departments. His main research focus is the study of childhood and youth.

Dr. David Patton: Exoplanets 

In recent years, astronomers have discovered thousands of planets in orbit around other stars, including some which are similar in size to the Earth. I will review some of these exoplanet discoveries, with a focus on planets which may be suitable for life. This talk is most suitable for high school students, and available in the Peterborough area. Dr. Patton is a Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Ms. Jesiqua Rapley: Handling Stress in High School and Beyond

This talk focuses on ways in which teens can handle their stress in school and in their daily lives. The talk includes tips and tricks as well as resources that teens can use when they are feeling spread too thin. It is designed to offer teens supports for their lives now and for when they move on to post-secondary school.

Mr. Jacob Rodenburg: Revisiting the Games of our Ancestors and First Nations

In this engaging and interactive session, we’ll explore hands-on games and traditional skills from the rich cultures of Canada’s First Nations and Inuit People.  We’ll learn about bow drill and hand drill fire making techniques, we’ll participate in interactive northern games that were designed to build dexterity, strength, agility and endurance.  Many of these games are still played today.  The wonderful thing about traditional games is that they require little in the way of equipment, they don’t use space and at least everybody is good at something.

Dr. Margaret Steffler: Canadian and Global Girlhoods: From Anne of Green Gables to I am Malala

This talk considers narratives of girlhood and ways in which the figure of “the girl” has been constructed as both a victim and a saviour. We will look at examples of fictional girlhoods and real girlhoods. We will also consider the formation, intentions and impact of movements such as Because I am a Girl (Plan Canada) and The Girl Effect (The Nike Foundation). This talk is most suitable for high school students. Dr. Steffler is with the Department of English Literature.

Ms. Katie Tremblay-Beaton: Music Education in the 21st Century

How might we teach for 21st century music learning? What would this look like in our classrooms? How could students use technology to connect, create, and engage with music in a meaningful way? This talk focuses on the big ideas of music education at the high school level as well as in preparation for post-secondary learning.  This talk is appropriate at the Gr.7-12 level and can be delivered in Peterborough or Durham.  Ms. Tremblay-Beaton is a sessional instructor in the School of Education and Professional Learning at Trent University, a PhD Student at U of T/OISE, and a teacher in the Durham District School Board.

Dr. Andrew Vreugdenhill: Green Chemistry: Doing Chemistry Differently

Chemistry is an essential part of our modern lives from the batteries in our portable electronics to the clothes we wear. However, we need to change the impact our lives have on the earth. What is chemistry doing? Green chemistry is the idea that the way we do chemistry in the lab and in the factory can be changed to reduce our environmental foot print.
Level: students ideally know something about science, be able to talk about different materials and how things are made. This talk is best suited for High School students. Dr. Vreugdenhill is with the Department of Chemistry. Requirements: Some table space (no particular chemical hazards).

Ms. Susan Willis Chan: The Secret Lives of Native Bees

Native bees differ greatly from the well known honey bee.  These bees comprise more than 99% of the bee species in Ontario and their importance in pollination of both human food crops and native plants is often underestimated.  This talk will explain pollination and introduce students to the many fascinating native bees, their behaviour, and their special role in pollination.  Students will learn about endangered pollinators and how to protect pollinators.

Dr. Rachel Wortis: Phases of Matter 

Dr. Wortis is a physicist and she studies electronic properties of materials. This talk explores how extreme cold changes the properties of objects. The talk can be adapted to a wide range of grade levels from 1st grade through high school. For younger grades the focus will be on structural phases: solid, liquid and gas. For older students electronic phases can be addressed, including insulating, metallic and superconducting behaviors.The presentation can be in English or French. Dr. Wortis is with the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

 

 

Spring 2016: Trent Talks High School Edition

April 2016:

I.E. Weldon S.S., Lindsay
Dr. Melanie Buddle: How to Prepare for First-year University: You Can do This!

Holy Trinity Catholic Secondary School, Courtice
Dr. Magda Havas: Electrosmog and the Importance of Using Wireless Technology Safely

May 2016:

Adam Scott, Peterborough
Dr. Joanna Freeland: Evolution: A Thing of the Past?

Virtual Learning Centre
Dr. Roger Lohmann: Using Anthropology to End War and Maintain Peace

St. Thomas Aquinas Secondary School, Lindsay
Dr. Andrew Vreugdenhill: Green Chemistry: Doing Chemistry Differently

Adam Scott, Peterborough
Dr. David Patton: Exoplanets

Haliburton Highlands Secondary School
Dr. Momin Rahman: Celebrities and their Evil Twins

Fenelon Falls Secondary School
How to Prepare for First-year University: You Can do This!

 

Full list of Spring 2016 Talks

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Dr. Molly Blyth: Learning From the Inuit of the Eastern Arctic: Trent’s Baffin Island Field School

 Molly’s talk focuses on cultural survival: “The Inuit taught us how they are re-inventing and celebrating their cultural identity in a contemporary global world. Their greatest threat is the neo-colonial culture of the south; yet, their best hope for cultural survival lies in strategically appropriating what’s best from the West. Snowmobiles are useful hunting caribou; whale blubber (muktuk) dipped in soy sauce is actually yummy; and char sushi is fabulous. This talk is available for either Durham or Trillium schools, for high school students. Molly teaches in the Department of Canadian Studies.

Dr. Rita Bode: In Our Midst: L. M. Montgomery in Ontario

Lucy Maud Montgomery made her home province of Prince Edward Island famous the world over through her creation of red-haired, high-spirited Anne. For almost half her life, however, Montgomery’s home was Ontario where she lived from 1911 until her death in 1942, in the towns of Leaskdale, and Norval, in the city of Toronto, and vacationed in Bala. In Ontario, she took up the duties of a minister’s wife and became a mother. Despite her fears that she would never write again, her Ontario years proved prolific. She added substantially to the Anne series, created the Emily and Pat series, and wrote a range of poems, stories and other novels, including The Blue Castle, her only novel set entirely outside of Prince Edward Island. During these years, Montgomery also continued her journal writing, and re-writing, fashioning herself in ways that reveal an intense inner life of both happiness and pain. This project examines some of the literature that Montgomery produced during her Ontario years within their Ontario context, reflecting the complexity of her psyche, her life, and the period, and considers also her presence through the educational and tourist sites and public spaces dedicated to her in Ontario. Dr. Bode is with the Department of English Literature at Trent University Durham; this talk is available in Durham or Toronto.

Dr. Melanie Buddle: How to Prepare for First-year University: You can do this!

In this presentation, Melanie will provide an overview of what a student can expect when making the transition from high school to university/college and she’ll offer some insight about how students can best prepare for that transition and make the most of their first-year experience. She also provides an overview of really useful resources (from health and wellness to academic skills and careers) available to students in post-secondary institutions to help them balance their emotional, physical and academic needs. Melanie has a doctorate in Canadian History and has taught courses in the History and Canadian studies departments at Trent. She is now an academic advisor and meets regularly with students who are in every stage of their university journey, from ‘just about to attend’ to ‘just about to graduate.’

Dr. Paul Elliott: Bats: the Truth is Stranger Than Fiction

From Batman to Dracula we encounter misleading portrayals of bats in stories and myth; but what are the real animals like? The truth is at least as strange as fiction. What does the study of bats tell us about these unique creatures? What can our relationship with them teach us about ourselves? This presentation can be tailored to suit any age group, with varying levels of interaction. Depending on the time of year and location, this talk can also be delivered as an evening session that finished with a bat walk. Dr. Elliott is with the School of Education and Professional Learning.

Dr. Hugh Elton: Studying Roman Warfare in the 21st Century

The talk looks at how computer modelling and serious games have begun to change the study of Roman warfare. This talk can be delivered in Peterborough during the daytime, utilizing a PowerPoint presentation. Dr. Elton is with the Department of Ancient History and Classics.

Dr. Neil Emery: Amazing Feats With Plants - by Fooling Them With Their Own Chemicals

Dr. Emery works on the chemistry of plants and, in particular, plant hormones. He looks at how these growth-controlling chemicals can dramatically change how plants develop. For example, much of his work discovers how plant hormones can alter how many flowers and seeds are produced, and how this can be manipulated to improve crop yields to feed the earth's growing population. Dr. Emery is with the Department of Biology.

Dr. Michael Fox: Fish and Fish Ecology

The topic of this talk is flexible, and suitable for any age group. Some possible topics are 
- Aquatic invasive species: What makes a species invasive in an aquatic environment? Why should we be concerned about them? What are some of the main species of concern in central Canada? What can be done about them?
- Freshwater fishes and their adaptations: What are some of the dominant fish species in our area? How do they differ in body type? What do they eat and how are they adapted to catch their prey? How are fishes different from warm-blooded animals like birds and mammals? How can we sample them? Dr. Fox is with the School of the Environment and the Department of Biology.

Dr. Joanna Freeland: Evolution: A Thing of the Past?

This talk focuses on what we mean by evolution, and why it remains critically important that we understand this process from the perspective of current issues such as antibiotic resistance, adaptation to climate change, agriculture, and invasive species. This talk is suitable for Grades 5 and above. Dr. Freeland is with the Department of Biology.

Dr. Leo Groarke: Preparing for the Future: A Conversation

There are no experts on the future. Especially now, when we live in a time of dynamic change – socially, economically, culturally.  How might a teenager prepare for such a future? This conversation is geared towards High School students.  Dr. Groarke is Trent University's President and Vice-Chancellor.

Dr. Magda Havas: Electrosmog and the Importance of Using Wireless Technology Safely

Dr. Havas is with the Environmental and Resource Studies/Science (ERS) Program at Trent University.

Dr. Roger Lohmann: Using Anthropology to End War and Maintain Peace

100 years after World War I, which was dubbed "the war to end all wars," violent conflict and military means of protection and control continue to be widespread. Arguing that the tragedy and waste of war is not inevitable, Dr. Lohmann describes his ethnographic research in Papua New Guinea on how several tribes went from recurrent warfare to a lasting peace. These and other anthropological findings on warfare and peacemaking around the world, past and present, show that war can be avoided indefinitely by anthropologically engineering and communicating cultural means of defusing the triggers of war. Dr. Lohman is an Associate Professor of Anthropology, Trent University Durham.

Dr. Blair Niblett: Narrating Activist Education: Teacher's Stories of Affecting Social and Political Change

This talk focuses on relationships between activism and education. Key questions might include: What is a teacher? What do teachers do? Do teachers change us as people? If so, how do/should they do that? What are the limits of the kinds of ways that teachers can influence students? What is activism? Is activism too radical for schools? Can students really make a difference in their communities? In the world? Dr. Niblett's talk is appropriate at the Gr. 7-12 level and can be delivered in Peterborough or Durham. Dr. Niblett is with the School of Education and Professional Learning.

Dr. Erica Nol: Bird Conservation: Should we be Worried About our Feathered Friends?

This talk is offered in Peterborough, for various grades. Weather permitting, this talk will take place outside (students will need pencils and paper). Dr. Nol is with the Department of Biology.

Dr. David Patton: Exoplanets 

In recent years, astronomers have discovered thousands of planets in orbit around other stars, including some which are similar in size to the Earth. I will review some of these exoplanet discoveries, with a focus on planets which may be suitable for life. This talk is most suitable for high school students, and available in the Peterborough area. Dr. Patton is a Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Dr. Momin Rahman: 
 
Celebrities and their Evil Twins 

We live in a celebrity obsessed culture and in this talk we will discuss the reasons why we are so keen on celebrity in our contemporary era. We will think about how the 'magic' of celebrity operates but also whether celebrity culture distracts us from the realities of life. This talk is more suitable for an older audience participating in consumer and popular culture through their peer group as individuals. Dr Rahman is with the Department of Sociology.

Islamophobia, Orientalism and Racism

We live in a time where the focus on Muslims as problem populations is a constant feature of politics and culture.  In this talk, I explain the research that shows how this focus on Muslims is part of a way of thinking described as Orientalism, and how this developed during western colonialism.  I also discuss whether the current version of Islamophobia can be thought of as a form of racism, and what effects this might have on Muslim populations living in our communities.

Dr. Aaron Slepkov: How is a Laser Different Than a Lightbulb? Perhaps it isn't...

Lasers have been around for the last fifty years, and their uses and applications are ever expanding. Most people have the notion that laser light is somehow special and certainly different than lightbulb- or candle-light. Is it? Dr. Slepkov's talk focuses on the current everyday applications of lasers and discusses when a laser could be replaced by a different (perhaps less expensive) light source. The talk is appropriate for grades 6 through 12. Dr. Slepkov is  with the Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Canada Research Chair in the Physics of Biomaterials.

Dr. Andrew Vreugdenhill: Green Chemistry: Doing Chemistry Differently

Chemistry is an essential part of our modern lives from the batteries in our portable electronics to the clothes we wear. However, we need to change the impact our lives have on the earth. What is chemistry doing? Green chemistry is the idea that the way we do chemistry in the lab and in the factory can be changed to reduce our environmental foot print.
Level: students ideally know something about science, be able to talk about different materials and how things are made. This talk is best suited for High School students. Dr. Vreugdenhill is with the Department of Chemistry. Requirements: Some table space (no particular chemical hazards).

Dr. Shaoling Wang: Chinese Language and Culture in Action: Chinese Gong Fu (Martial Arts) and Dance

Dr. Shaoling Wang possesses an academic background of Chinese Linguistics, second language acquisition and second language teaching and learning. She has been teaching Chinese language and culture in the department of Modern Languages and Literatures at Trent University since 2007. Dr. Wang also has a foundation and formal training in Modern Dance, Jazz, Afri-Caribbean Jazz, Hula, and is a licensed Zumba instructor.

Dr. Bradley White: Wildlife DNA Forensics

Conservation of our wildlife for future generations to enjoy depends on enforcing Provincial and Federal Legislation. In Ontario we analyse DNA in cases of illegal commercialization of game meat. This is often in the form of sausages where moose or white-tailed deer meat is mixed with pork or beef with spices in the form of honey garlic or spicy Italian. DNA can identify both the types of meat present and the proportions. Poaching is a growing problem especially in protected areas such as Parks. We use methods of individual identification to compare kill sites with meat in freezers or blood on clothes or in trucks. We have been performing these DNA analyses for the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources for 25 years. At the Federal Level we perform DNA analyses to investigate cross border traffic for legislation such as the Convention in Trade of Endangered Species. We use DNA to identify endangered coral or ivory in jewelry and ornaments. We also use DNA to examine potential fraud in shipments of fish and shell-fish. This work has acted as a major deterrent and helped significantly in protecting wildlife and harvested species. This talk is suitable for students in Grade 5 or above (some sensitive content). Dr. White is with the Department of Biology.

Dr. Rachel Wortis: Phases of Matter 

Dr. Wortis is a physicist and she studies electronic properties of materials. This talk explores how extreme cold changes the properties of objects. The talk can be adapted to a wide range of grade levels from 1st grade through high school. For younger grades the focus will be on structural phases: solid, liquid and gas. For older students electronic phases can be addressed, including insulating, metallic and superconducting behaviors.The presentation can be in English or French. Dr. Wortis is with the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Dr. Marguerite A. Xenopoulos: What is Limnology?

The study of inland waters, lakes, rivers, ponds and wetlands. Learn what limnologists do, what they study and what kind of funky tools they use to collect water and the critters that live in water.This talk can be adapted for any age group. Dr. Xenopoulos is with the Department of Biology.

 

2014-2015: 50 Talks in 50 Schools

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 As part of Trent University's 50th Anniversary Celebration in the 2014/15 Academic Year, a series of lectures were organized: 50 talks in 50 schools. The talks have now been rebranded as Trent Talks High School Edition. The talks were organized by Melanie Buddle and Sabine McConnell. The talks were also free and took place from September 2014 to June 2015.

"I am excited about our 50 talks program. It is a sincere attempt to give back to the community that made us who and what we are. Giving takes many forms. Sharing ideas and discussion is an essential one for a university, especially one which is as interested in the community as we are."   -Dr. Leo Groarke President and Vice-Chancellor Trent University

The views and opinions expressed by the speakers and in the talks listed here are their own and should not be taken to reflect the official policy or position of Trent University as a whole. Trent University fully embraces academic freedom and personal freedom of thought and choice.

 

June 2014

Dr. Ray Dart visited St. Paul's
Chad Cuss spoke to a class at Crestwood Secondary School
Dr. Stephen Hill visited Kenner

October 2014

Dr. LaFleur spoke to a class at Immaculate Conception
Dr. Elliott visited a class in Norwood

November 2014

Dr. Elton spoke to a class at Westmount
Dr. Elliott visited Edmison Heights
Dr. Xenopolous visited Immaculate Conception
Dr. Haines spoke at St. Thomas Aquina in Lindsay
Dr. Kay visited a class at Prince of Wales
Dr. Emery visited Queen Mary
Dr. Rahman went to Crestwood
Dr. Balfour spoke to a class at I.E. Weldon
Dr. Dart visited LCVI
Dr. Emery spoke at Queen Mary
Dr. Wortis visited Emison Heights
Dr. White gave a talk at Armour Heights
Dr. Fox visited a school in Oshawa
Dr. Nol spoke at Prince of Wales
Dr. McLeod visited Crestwood
Dr. Fox went to Thomas A. Stewart
Dr. McConnell visited Children's Montessori school and a home school
Dr. Patton spoke at Lakefield College School
Dr. Blyth visited classes at LCVI and I.E. Weldon

December 2014

Dr. Sagarra visited Westmount P.S.
Dr. Smith spoke to a class at Pope John Paul II
Dr. Brunetti visited a class at Chemong Public School
Dr. Groarke spoke to a class at St. Stephen Secondary school
Dr. Buddle visited St. Stephen Secondary school
Dr. Freeland spoke at Crestwood
Dr. Vreugdenhill visited Crestwood
Dr. Slepkov spoke to a class at Westmount

January 2015

Dr. Hanley-Dafoe spoke at Lakefield College School
Dr. Thomas, Dr. McConnell and Chad Cuss visited schools in Haliburton
Dr. Vreugdenhill and Dr. Brunetti spoke to classes at Adam Scott
Chad Cuss gave a talk at Queen Elizabeth
Dr. Vreugdenhill spoke at Holy Trinity
Dr. Wortis visited St. Paul's
Dr. McConnell spoke at the Kawartha Montessori School

The views and opinions expressed by the speakers and in the TrentTalks listed here are their own and should not be taken to reflect the official policy or position of Trent University as a whole. Trent University fully embraces academic freedom and personal freedom of thought and choice.

Full list of 2014-2015 Talks

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Dr. Dimitry Anastakis: The Past Like You've Never Heard it Before: Canadian History through Murder, Execution, Assassination and Suicide from Confederation to the War on Terror

Was Louis Riel a traitor who deserved to be executed, or was he unfairly hanged? Did diplomat Herbert Norman kill himself in Cairo in 1957 because of American accusations that he was a Communist? Was the Air India Flight 182 bombing “Canada’s 9/11”? What does it mean for immigrants, minorities, and citizens in the current “Global War on Terror”? By utilizing dramatic and sometimes tragic episodes, the lecture engages students in many of the political, social, economic and cultural changes experienced by Canadians in the last century and a half. In doing so, it is designed to give students an insight into the transformation of Canada since Confederation, and how these changes help to explain and contextualize many aspects of present-day Canada. Professor Anastakis is with the Department of History.

Dr. Gillian Balfour: To Do as She is Told: Prisoner Discipline and Resistance in Canadian Womens Prisons 1950-2000

This talk explores the history of women's federal imprisonment, specifically how women were disciplined and how they resisted their confinement. Using archival data and case studies, I show the unique ways in which punishment is gendered to better understand contemporary issues inside women's prisons, such as the use of segregation. Dr. Balfour is a Professor in the Department of Sociology.

Dr. Sylvie Bérard: Montreal’s Saint-Laurent Boulevard-“The Main”: A Cultural Journey

St. Laurent Boulevard was the first road that ran across the island of Montreal from the old fortifications to the parish of St. Laurent. It remained the most important north-south avenue of the city, which gave rise to its common name, “The Main”. However, it is more than just a commercial street. In this talk, I would like to invite you to a geographical, historical, and cultural journey on “The Main”. Through the study of foundational locations, in real life but also as seen by its writers and artists, we will explore the cultural history of Montreal and, perhaps, by extension, of Quebec. The talk can be delivered in English or French, a full description in both languages is here.
Dr. Bérard is with the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

Dr. Molly Blyth, Co-leading Trent’s Baffin Island Field School: Learning from the Inuit of the eastern Arctic

Molly’s talk focuses on cultural survival: “the Inuit taught us the importance of celebrating difference, a lesson we translated into our own lives on our return. Their greatest threat is the neo-colonial culture of the south; yet, the best hope for cultural survival lies in strategically appropriating what’s best in the West. Snowmobiles were useful in hunting caribou; whale blubber (muktuk) dipped in soy sauce was actually yummy; sushi char was fabulous; and Skype was the best way to connect over long Arctic distances.”. This talk is available for either Durham or Trillium schools, for high school or primary students. Molly teaches in the Departments of Canadian Studies and English Literature.

Dr. Rita Bode, In Our Midst: L. M. Montgomery in Ontario

Lucy Maud Montgomery made her home province of Prince Edward Island famous the world over through her creation of red-haired, high-spirited Anne. For almost half her life, however, Montgomery’s home was Ontario where she lived from 1911 until her death in 1942, in the towns of Leaskdale, and Norval, in the city of Toronto, and vacationed in Bala. In Ontario, she took up the duties of a minister’s wife and became a mother. Despite her fears that she would never write again, her Ontario years proved prolific. She added substantially to the Anne series, created the Emily and Pat series, and wrote a range of poems, stories and other novels, including The Blue Castle, her only novel set entirely outside of Prince Edward Island. During these years, Montgomery also continued her journal writing, and re-writing, fashioning herself in ways that reveal an intense inner life of both happiness and pain. This project examines some of the literature that Montgomery produced during her Ontario years within their Ontario context, reflecting the complexity of her psyche, her life, and the period, and considers also her presence through the educational and tourist sites and public spaces dedicated to her in Ontario. Dr. Bode is with the Department of English Literature; this talk is available in Durham or Toronto.

Dr. Jonathan Bordo: The Métier Within Cultural Studies, a Reflection Upon Two Decades of Teaching and Research at Trent

The lecture will expose the kind of inquiry, the approach to inquiry and the outcomes to inquiry conducted under the rubric "cultural studies," through a few examples drawn from the work of colleagues, from the work of doctoral students and finally from his own work and teaching practice, which he considers a métier. The keyword that Jonathan would use to describe that practice in its aspiration and at its best is 'acute.' The lecture should be of interest to anyone who has wondered just what is cultural does and what does it do? This talk is available in the second half of the school year. Dr. Bordo is the director of the Cultural Studies Doctoral Program.

Dr. Craig Brunetti: The Future of Biology - Decoding Your DNA

Learning to understand DNA is really to learn and understand about ourselves. In this discussion, we will explore how DNA not only connects humans together but also how all life on this planet is interconnected. Dr. Brunetti is with the Department of Biology.

Dr. Craig Brunetti: Ebola Virus - What do you Need to Know?

A discussion about the virus and the 2014/2015 outbreak. A talk about the facts and some of the misconceptions about the virus.

Dr. Melanie Buddle: How to Prepare for First-year University: You can do this!

In this presentation, Melanie will provide an overview of what a student can expect when making the transition from high school to university/college and she’ll offer some insight about how students can best prepare for that transition and make the most of their first-year experience. She also provides an overview of really useful resources (from health and wellness to academic skills and careers) available to students in post-secondary institutions to help them balance their emotional, physical and academic needs. Melanie has a doctorate in Canadian History and has taught courses in the History and Canadian studies departments at Trent. She is now an academic advisor and meets regularly with students who are in every stage of their university journey, from ‘just about to attend’ to ‘just about to graduate.’

Chad Cuss: University Adventures in Biogeochemistry, Humus, and Machine Learning After Hating Math and Failing Chemistry in High School 

An overview of my research and experiences at Trent, with emphasis on the importance of biogeochemistry for understanding global climate change, the importance of mathematics for understanding bioeochemistry, and the importance of Trent University for shaping my understanding and future opportunities. Chad Cuss is a PhD student in the Environmental & Life Sciences Graduate Program.

Dr. Raymond Dart: The Top Ten Things That Make or Break Your First Year at University (From a Seasoned Instructor of First Year Courses at Trent)

Prof. Dart has taught first year classes since he began working at Trent in 2001. He has taught a LOT of first year students, and has seen the range from incredible successes to messes failures, and everything in between. From his experience, Ray will describe what he thinks are the common threads which differentiate ‘excellent’ first year experiences from this which leave something to be desired. Dr. Raymond Dart is the Director of Business Administration.

Dr. Christopher Dummitt: Why do Men Barbecue? A Historian’s Answer

There’s something almost timeless about the ritual of men grilling meat over a fire. Yet when a historian seriously asks why men barbecue, the question leads to some surprising and complicated answers that tell us a good deal about our ideas about gender in the 20th and even the 21st century. Dr. Dummitt is with the Department of Canadian Studies.

Dr. Paul Elliott: Bats: The Truth is Stranger Than Fiction

From Batman to Dracula we encounter misleading portrayals of bats in stories and myth; but what are the real animals like? The truth is at least as strange as fiction. What does the study of bats tell us about these unique creatures? What can our relationship with them teach us about ourselves? This presentation can be tailored to suit any age group, with varying levels of interaction. Depending on the time of year and location, this talk can also be delivered as an evening session that finished with a bat walk. Dr. Elliott is with the School of Education and Professional Learning.

Dr. Hugh Elton: Studying Roman Warfare in the 21st Century

The talk looks at how computer modelling and serious games have begun to change the study of Roman warfare. This talk can be delivered in Peterborough during the daytime, utilizing a PowerPoint presentation. Dr. Elton is with the Department of Ancient History and Classics.

Dr. Neil Emery: Amazing Feats With Plants - by Fooling Them With Their Own Chemicals

Dr. Emery works on the chemistry of plants and, in particular, plant hormones. He looks at how these growth-controlling chemicals can dramatically change how plants develop. For example, much of his work discovers how plant hormones can alter how many flowers and seeds are produced, and how this can be manipulated to improve crop yields to feed the earth's growing population. Dr. Emery is with the Department of Biology.

Dr. Michael Fox: Fish and Fish Ecology

The topic of this talk is flexible, and suitable for any age group. Some possible topics are 
- Aquatic invasive species: What makes a species invasive in an aquatic environment? Why should we be concerned about them? What are some of the main species of concern in central Canada? What can be done about them?
- Freshwater fishes and their adaptations: What are some of the dominant fish species in our area? How do they differ in body type? What do they eat and how are they adapted to catch their prey? How are fishes different from warm-blooded animals like birds and mammals? How can we sample them? Dr. Fox is with the School of the Environment and the Department of Biology.

Dr. Joanna Freeland: Evolution: A Thing of the Past?

This talk focuses on what we mean by evolution, and why it remains critically important that we understand this process from the perspective of current issues such as antibiotic resistance, adaptation to climate change, agriculture, and invasive species. This talk is suitable for Grades 5 and above. Dr. Freeland is with the Department of Biology.

Dr. Sita A. Gardner: Managing the World Economy: The International Monetary System

Post WWII, the world economy underwent dramatic changes. Foremost was the emergence of U.S. hegemony and the dominance of the U.S. economy. To counter the disarray that characterized the international economy during the inter-war period, the foundations for the postwar liberal economic system were laid. This talk will discuss the history of the Post WWII international monetary system and the impact of monetary regimes on “North-South relations”. Sita Gardner is with the Centre for Strategic Studies of Global Politics at Trent University. The talk is appropriate for students in their final year of High School and is available in Peterborough and the Durham Region.

Dr. Philip Giurlando: Rise of Radical Politics in Europe

Dr. Giurlando's talk will focus on the recent increase in support for the noe-Nazi and other radical right wing parties in Europe, and could be delivered in the Toronto area or Peterborough. Dr. Giurlando is with the Department of Political Studies.

Dr. Leo Groarke: Preparing for the Future: A Conversation

There are no experts on the future. Especially now, when we live in a time of dynamic change – socially, economically, culturally.  How might a teenager prepare for such a future? This conversation is geared towards High School students.  Dr. Groarke is Trent University's President and Vice-Chancellor.

Dr. Céline Guéguen

Dr. Guéguen is with the Department of Chemistry

Dr. Helen Haines: Archaeology vs. Indiana Jones: Getting the Real Dirt as Seen From the Trenches of an Ancient Maya City 

Recent discoveries at the ancient Maya site of Ka’Kabish, Belize will be discussed to illuminate both the dynamics of early state development and the realities of archaeology, what it’s like, and what it contributes to our understanding of human social development. Dr. Haines is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology based on the Trent-Durham campus. Her research at Ka’Kabish, Belize, recently received a grant from the National Geographic Society’s Committee for Research and Exploration.

Robyne Hanley-Dafoe: Fostering Resiliency in our Students and Children

Robyne Hanley-Dafoe’s talk explores what makes children resilient. Sharing from her experiences travelling through Honduras and then on to Israel and Jordan and back to Peterborough Ontario, Robyne reviews what children have in common that contributes to resiliency, and what teachers and families can do to foster a resilient child. Robyne introduces the notion of cultural competency and presents strategies for children to view themselves as global citizens. This talk is available for early elementary to high-school.

Dr. Magda Havas: Electrosmog and the Importance of Using Wireless Technology Safely

Dr. Havas is with the Environmental and Resource Studies/Science (ERS) Program at Trent University.

Dr. Julia Harrison: Why do we Love the Cottage?

A weekend at the cottage is assumed by many Ontarians to be central to what makes Canadians, Canadian. In this anthropological journey to the cottage, I reflect on why the cottage is understood to be a truly ‘Canadian’ experience, who really does the ‘work’ at the cottage, why everyone loves their family when they are at the cottage, and on what the future of this iconic experience might be as Canadian population demographics change. Professor Emeritus Julia Harrison taught in both Anthropology and the graduate programmes in Canadian Studies and Indigenous Studies.

Dr. Michael Hickson: Philosophy for the 21st Century

This talk will introduce students to Philosophy by exploring its application to a variety of 21st-century questions including some of the following: Can computers think? Should we fight wars using robot drones? Is social media, like Facebook and Twitter, changing the nature of friendship, democracy, and other human institutions for better or worse? If scientists developed an “immortality pill” that would make you live forever, would you take the pill? What is human cloning and should it be legal in Canada? This talk is geared to students in grades 7 through 12, and can be offered in English or French. Michael Hickson teaches in the Philosophy Department.

Dr. Sheliza Ibrahim-Khan: School, Science & Society: Learning Science in our Local Communities

This talk shares a comparative study of two action research projects that follow science students on a journey to increase their science knowledge on socio-scientific issues that they presented as important to them and their community. One project follows a group of elementary students, the other, a group of teacher candidates. The inquiry-based explorations touched on vastly different issues stemming from the experiential and generational interests of these two groups. Topics include exploring a sister’s health problem, hosting science workshops to engage Aboriginal youth, planting urban gardens, providing support for a local soup kitchen, and setting up an art installation in the forest. The outcomes revealed ways in which students impacted their communities, and learned something about science and themselves. This talk can be delivered in the Toronto area. Dr. Ibrahim-Khan is with the School of Education and Professional Learning

Dr. Aisha Jamal, German Film and Contemporary Art- from Research to Personal Practice

Dr. Jamal's research interests are German cinema, European cinema of migration, contemporary art, and Afghan-German art practices. This talk is geared towards high school students in Toronto or Peterborough. Dr. Jamal is a professor in the German section, and also creates short films.

Dr. Carolyn Kay, The Third Reich, Germans and Hitler: How One Man Became so Popular, Powerful and Dangerous

She would like to speak to local high school students about how Nazi propaganda created a false and yet positive image of Hitler during a time of political, social and economic crisis, leading to enormous popular support for Hitler and allowing the progression towards war and genocide. Dr. Kay is a Professor in the Department of History.

Dr. Peter Lafleur: Conducting Research in the Canadian Arctic - How and Why

This talk is directed at how and why we undertake Arctic research, leaning more towards the how. Dr. LaFleur will use a slideshow that shows where the Arctic is, we travel there and in the field, what life in a research camp is like and what animals we meet out on the tundra. It is very descriptive and as such geared toward the primary/intermediate grades. Dr. Lafleur is with the Department of Geography.

Dr. Roger Lohmann: Using Anthropology to End War and Maintain Peace

100 years after World War I, which was dubbed "the war to end all wars," violent conflict and military means of protection and control continue to be widespread. Arguing that the tragedy and waste of war is not inevitable, Dr. Lohmann describes his ethnographic research in Papua New Guinea on how several tribes went from recurrent warfare to a lasting peace. These and other anthropological findings on warfare and peacemaking around the world, past and present, show that war can be avoided indefinitely by anthropologically engineering and communicating cultural means of defusing the triggers of war. Dr. Lohman is an Associate Professor of Anthropology, Trent University Durham.

Dr. Sabine McConnell: How to be Safe Online: Dealing With Cyberbullying and Being Street Smart in the World Wide Web

Suitable for Grades 5 and up, this talk will discuss rules and strategies that help protect students, their privacy, and their computers from online threats. Dr. McConnell is with the Department of Computing and Information Systems.

Dr. Blair Niblett: Narrating Activist Education: Teacher's Stories of Affecting Social and Political Change

This talk focuses on relationships between activism and education. Key questions might include: What is a teacher? What do teachers do? Do teachers change us as people? If so, how do/should they do that? What are the limits of the kinds of ways that teachers can influence students? What is activism? Is activism too radical for schools? Can students really make a difference in their communities? In the world? Dr. Niblett's talk is appropriate at the Gr. 7-12 level and can be delivered in Peterborough or Durham. Dr. Niblett is with the School of Education and Professional Learning.

Dr. Erica Nol: Have You Seen the Birds?

This talk is offered in Peterborough, for various grades. Weather permitting, this talk will take place outside (students will need pencils and paper). Dr. Nol is with the Department of Biology.

Malcolm MacTaggart: Perhaps you Should Work for Yourself?

The rise in interest in being in business for yourself (i.e Entrepreneurship) and the importance that 'owner-managed' businesses make to Canada's economy (97% of companies have fewer than 50 employees), understanding the pluses (and minuses) of owning your own business is a good thing to know. Professor Taggart teaches for Business Administration.

Dr. Lewis McLeod: They Never Chat, They Make Speeches All The Time: On Serious Literature and Fun Books 

When we speak or think about great books, we tend to use terms like “timeless classic” and “enduring masterpiece” to describe them. We also like to think of them as “weighty” or “deep.” At the same time, we know that even the best jokes get old, that they don’t benefit from extended, sober, secondary analysis. We don’t usually describe good jokes as “heavy.” The result is a scenario in which “good” literature and “serious” literature are seen to be more or less the same thing, and comic novels belong to some “light,” secondary category. This talk asks: i) “Can a funny book be great if it’s not at all heavy?” and ii) “Can a book be a masterpiece if it isn’t timeless?” I’ll try to suggest that literary studies (which has always regarded itself as “serious business”) has been ill-equipped to deal with the time-sensitive and often quixotic procedures of the comic novel. To demonstrate how this works and doesn’t work, I’ll be talking a lot about the work of Penelope Fitzgerald and Nancy Mitford. No advanced reading is required, but, really, you should be reading these women anyway, for your own reasons. Because it’s fun.

Dr. Fergal O'Hagan: Concussion Perceptions and Prevention: Is it all in the Head?

In this talk I will discuss the role of athlete beliefs about concussion injuries, their views and intentions on prevention behaviours and how they see concussion in relation to other injuries and concussion risk across sports. I present recent research findings from varsity athletes. I will discuss how these findings can inform concussion prevention and management programs. 

Dr. David Patton: Exoplanets 

In recent years, astronomers have discovered thousands of planets in orbit around other stars, including some which are similar in size to the Earth. I will review some of these exoplanet discoveries, with a focus on planets which may be suitable for life. This talk is most suitable for high school students, and available in the Peterborough area. Dr. Patton is a Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Dr. Brian Patrick: Digital Fossils

Whenever you send an email, a text, a tweet; whenever you post a blog, a photo, a video; whenever you download a file or accept a friend, you are burying your own digital fossils. These fossils can be dug up today, tomorrow, next decade whenever you look for a job, whenever you seek a relationship … whenever someone searches. It is therefore wise to exercise respect and judgment in all your communications and in all your online activities. The digital world is always watching and the digital world never forgets. This talk is best suited for Grades 7 to 12; Dr. Patrick is with the Department of Computing and Information Systems.

Catalina Sagarra: The Importance of Being Multilingual in Today’s World

Catalina’s research is in Genocide studies. She taught Spanish for a decade before coming to Trent, where she teaches French linguistics, language, literary criticism and literary analysis. Catalina is with the Department of Modern Languages and Literature.

Dr. Aaron Slepkov: How is a Laser Different Than a Lightbulb? Perhaps it isn't...

Lasers have been around for the last fifty years, and their uses and applications are ever expanding. Most people have the notion that laser light is somehow special and certainly different than lightbulb- or candle-light. Is it? Dr. Slepkov's talk focuses on the current everyday applications of lasers and discusses when a laser could be replaced by a different (perhaps less expensive) light source. The talk is appropriate for grades 6 through 12. Dr. Slepkov is  with the Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Canada Research Chair in the Physics of Biomaterials.

Dr. Momin Rahman: Celebrities and their Evil Twins 

We live in a celebrity obsessed culture and in this talk we will discuss the reasons why we are so keen on celebrity in our contemporary era. We will think about how the 'magic' of celebrity operates but also whether celebrity culture distracts us from the realities of life. This talk is more suitable for an older audience participating in consumer and popular culture through their peer group as individuals. Dr Rahman is with the Department of Sociology.

Professor Rhonda Smith: Law + Science = Forensics

Have you ever wondered why bugs matter in criminal law or how law and science can be uncomfortable room-mates?  This talk can be tailored to any grade level and is very experiential.  Discussion topics include the role of law in everyday life, the role of science in law and the skills of participants in the legal system.  This talk is available in multiple locations, including Peterborough, Durham (Bowmanville, Oshawa), Cobourg, Port Hope, and Lindsay. Professor Smith is with the Forensic Science Program at Trent University.

Dr. Brenda Smith-Chant, Making Sure Everyone 'Counts': Improving our Understanding About the Foundations of Math Learning

One of the current issues in education is the need to focus on encouraging students to better learn and engage with math.  One of the most important research findings is that what children learn about numbers at the very earliest stages of education sets the foundation of math performance across schooling.  In this talk, available in Peterborough and Oshawa (Fall), Dr. Smith-Chant will outline the important skills needed by children and how we can all help to teach children to be better in math so that everyone ‘counts’. Dr. Smith-Chant is with the Department of Psychology

Dr. Yves Thomas: The Café as Cultural Site

“Café” is a French word which literally means coffee. It also serves as a universal designation for a site where one drinks coffee to work, to enjoy with friends, to be convivial. In this latter definition, its function is primarily social. The first cafés pop up in Paris in the late seventeeth century. The café Procope, a restaurant and a café, opened its doors in 1686 and is still in operation today. In this talk, I will discuss why cafés, traditionally a hub for intellectuals in the enlightened 18th century and artists of the 19th and 20th centuries, have become so central to us in our everyday lives. Yves Thomas is Acting Chair of Cultural Studies. He teaches in French Studies. He is currently interested in the representations of the rebuilding of Paris during the Second Empire. 

Dr. Andrew Vreugdenhill: Green Chemistry: Doing Chemistry Differently

Chemistry is an essential part of our modern lives from the batteries in our portable electronics to the clothes we wear. However, we need to change the impact our lives have on the earth.  What is chemistry doing? Green chemistry is the idea that the way we do chemistry in the lab and in the factory can be changed to reduce our environmental foot print.
Level: students ideally know something about science, be able to talk about different materials and how things are made.This talk is best suited for High School students. Dr. Vreugdenhill is with the Department of Chemistry. Requirements: Some table space (no particular chemical hazards).

Dr. Peggy Wallace, CPA, CA, PhD: The Importance of Learning Accounting, the Language of Business

Many students take university accounting courses because they aspire to be an accountant, even though they don’t really know what accountants do. Other students avoid university accounting courses because “they don’t like math” or they “don’t want to be an accountant” even though they want to work “in business”. Accounting is the language of business. The focus of Dr. Wallace’s talk is the importance of learning this language regardless of whether you’re an entrepreneur, work in the marketing department of a large corporation or volunteer at a not-for-profit organization. She also addresses the existing stereotypes of accountants and the role(s) accountants play in business. Primary target audience is secondary school students. The talk is available in the Toronto and Peterborough areas. Dr. Wallace teaches accounting in the Department of Business Administration.

Dr. Shaoling Wang: Chinese Language and Culture in Action: Martial Arts and Dance

Dr. Shaoling Wang possesses an academic background of Chinese Linguistics, second language acquisition and second language teaching and learning. She has been teaching Chinese language and culture in the department of Modern Languages and Literatures at Trent University since 2007. Dr. Wang also has a foundation and formal training in Modern Dance, Jazz, Afri-Caribbean Jazz, Hula, and is a licensed Zumba instructor.

Dr. Jocelyn Williams: Mummies of South America

Did you know that the oldest artifical mummies in the world are from South America? This talk will explore the different types of mummies that have been found throughout South America, and how mummies have been studied to learn about ancient civilizations. We’ll focus in particular on the important ritual role that mummies played in the Inca civilization and how studying their mummies have helped us understand things like diet, religious beliefs, health, and population movement. Dr. Williams is with the Department of Anthropology and Director of the Trent University Archaeological Research Centre.

Dr. Bradley White: Wildlife DNA Forensics

Conservation of our wildlife for future generations to enjoy depends on enforcing Provincial and Federal Legislation. In Ontario we analyse DNA in cases of illegal commercialization of game meat. This is often in the form of sausages where moose or white-tailed deer meat is mixed with pork or beef with spices in the form of honey garlic or spicy Italian. DNA can identify both the types of meat present and the proportions. Poaching is a growing problem especially in protected areas such as Parks. We use methods of individual identification to compare kill sites with meat in freezers or blood on clothes or in trucks. We have been performing these DNA analyses for the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources for 25 years. At the Federal Level we perform DNA analyses to investigate cross border traffic for legislation such as the Convention in Trade of Endangered Species. We use DNA to identify endangered coral or ivory in jewelry and ornaments. We also use DNA to examine potential fraud in shipments of fish and shell-fish. This work has acted as a major deterrent and helped significantly in protecting wildlife and harvested species. This talk is suitable for students in Grade 5 or above (some sensitive content). Dr. White is with the Department of Biology.

Dr. Rachel Wortis: Phases of Matter 

Dr. Wortis is a physicist and she studies electronic properties of materials. This talk explores how extreme cold changes the properties of objects. The talk can be adapted to a wide range of grade levels from 1st grade through high school. For younger grades the focus will be on structural phases: solid, liquid and gas. For older students electronic phases can be addressed, including insulating, metallic and superconducting behaviors.The presentation can be in English or French. Dr. Wortis is with the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Dr. Marguerite A. Xenopoulos: What is Limnology?

The study of inland waters, lakes, rivers, ponds and wetlands. Learn what limnologists do, what they study and what kind of funky tools they use to collect water and the critters that live in water.This talk can be adapted for any age group. Dr. Xenopoulos is with the Department of Biology.